Now Playing
K92.3
Last Song Played
Orlando's Country
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
K92.3
Last Song Played
Orlando's Country

news

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Deputies: 2 arrested after 3-month-old child, 51 pounds of heroin, found in SUV

Deputies in Mississippi arrested two women Monday night on suspicion of drug trafficking after authorities said they found 51 pounds of heroin and a 3-month-old child in an SUV the women were driving.

>> Read more trending news

A deputy pulled over a Ford SUV on Interstate 20 in Rankin County on Monday night for an unspecified traffic violation. Authorities said that during the stop, the deputy became suspicious that the SUV was being used to transport drugs or contraband.

Deputies said the women in the vehicle, driver Arlene Viridiana Moya, 23, and passenger Trisha Lynne Ibarra, 23, allowed authorities to search the SUV. Inside, deputies said they found 51 pounds of heroin concealed in the vehicle.

Deputies estimated the drugs were worth between $2 million and $10 million.

Authorities also found Ibarra’s 3-month-old child in the SUV, deputies said. Rankin County Court Judge Tom Broome ordered the toddler be taken into the custody of Child Protective Services.

Moya, of Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, and Ibarra, of Laredo, Texas, were arrested on charges of aggravated trafficking of heroin.

Authorities continue to investigate the case.

Kroger looking to partner with Overstock.com: report

Kroger is considering teaming up with Overstock.com Inc. in an effort to compete with online retailers.

>> Read more trending news

The New York Post reported the Cincinnati-based grocer may be eyeing a deal with Overstock.com, according to sources. Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne said last year that he plans to sell or reorganize the e-commerce business to focus on blockchain technology. Kroger did not comment on the possible deal.

Overstock.com is based in Utah, and launched in 1999. The online retailer sells everything from furniture, rugs, decor and clothing to kitchen supplies, jewelry and toys.

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: Kroger to roll out digital aisle displays that connect to smartphones

If Kroger acquired Overstock.com, it would be yet another grocery chain to partner with an online retailer. Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market for nearly $14 billion in August 2017. Amazon announced it would immediately lower prices at Whole Foods and switch things up for consumers.

>> Related: Amazon raises monthly Prime membership rate

“This is just the beginning – we will make Amazon Prime the customer rewards program at Whole Foods Market and continuously lower prices as we invent together,” said Jeff Wilke, CEO of AmazonWorldwide Consumer. “There is significant work and opportunity ahead, and we’re thrilled to get started.”

Online grocery shopping is making major gains, according to the Food Marketing Institute’s U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends 2017 report. The number of shoppers buying some of their groceries online jumped to 11 percent in the first quarter compared to 5 percent in 2016, according to the report.

14-year-old accidentally shot, killed by older sister

A 14-year-old Indiana boy was accidentally shot and killed by his older sister Sunday as they and their father prepared to go target shooting.

Rex William Pruett was shot at his father’s home in Campbellsburg, a small Indiana town located about 50 miles northwest of Louisville, Kentucky. Rex, a seventh-grader at Orleans Junior-Senior High School, died a short time after his father rushed him to a hospital. 

“The father received a phone call and, while he was on the phone, the daughter, in what appeared to be unintentional, shot her brother with a .22-caliber revolver,” Indiana State Police spokesman Chad Dick told The Times-Mail in Bedford.

Officials at the boy’s school, where his sister is a ninth-grader, said that extra counselors were brought in Monday to help students cope with the tragedy. Police investigators waited to release the boy’s name until those measures were in place. 

“The first-period teachers had a written statement to read about the incident and then, for any students that need additional help, we have counselors standing by,” Orleans Community Schools Superintendent Gary McClintic told the newspaper.  

Chris Stevens, principal of the siblings’ school, showed a news crew from WAVE 3 News in Louisville Rex’s locker, which was adorned Monday with photos and letters from his classmates. 

“This does remind you quite a bit of Rex,” Stevens told the station. “There were a lot of tears and a lot of smiles today.”

Stevens said that faculty members and administrators have made it clear to students that the shooting was accidental. When Rex’s sister returns to class, they will offer her their support, he said. 

Family and friends also offered the girl their support on Facebook, where she described her younger brother as “such a sweet little boy.”

“Much love, Rexy, much love. We will all keep you in our hearts,” the girl wrote. 

>> Read more trending news

Stevens described the rural community as one in which guns are part of everyday life.

“In our elementary, at the sixth-grade level, we have a gun safety course that all of our students are allowed to go through,” Stevens told the news station

McClintic, who said he taught Rex’s father when he was a teacher, described the boy’s family as a good one that had been involved with Orleans’ public schools for multiple generations. 

“It’s hard on the community, just as much as it is on the school,” McClintic told The Times-Mail

Johnny Henderson, pastor of Lost River Missionary Baptist Church in Claysville, said that Rex and his family attended services there the morning of the shooting.

“He was an outstanding young man,” Henderson said.

The pastor said the Pruett family needs support, not criticism over the shooting.

“They need support and people to pray for them for peace and comfort,” Henderson said. “They still have a hard time going forward. They still have a funeral to go to.

“They are going to be living without this young man.”

Florida DA seeks death penalty in Tampa serial killings

Florida prosecutors said they will seek the death penalty for a 24-year-old man they say is responsible for randomly killing four people in a Tampa neighborhood will face the death penalty, according to news reports. 

>> Read more trending news

Howell Emanuel Donaldson III was charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of Benjamin Mitchell, 22; Monica Hoffa, 32; Anthony Naiboa, 20; and Ronald Felton, 60. 

“The death penalty is for the worst of the worst, crimes that are far more egregious than the typical murder, and that’s what we have here,” Hillsborough State Attorney Andrew Warren said at a 10:30 a.m. news conference Tuesday, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

The four victims were shot dead in October and November, sparking a manhunt in the Seminole Heights neighborhood. 

>> Who is Howell Emanuel Donaldson III?

Donaldson was arrested Nov. 28 after he handed a coworker at McDonald’s a bag with a pistol inside. The coworker then alerted police, who made the arrest.

The Tampa Police Department said that evidence later taken from the handgun connects it to all four murders, the Times reported. 

During the news conference, Warren said that his office decided to pursue the death penalty due to several factors. He said that Donaldson killed four innocent people in a “cold, calculated and premeditated manner” and that there is no evidence showing he is mentally ill. 

The defendant’s parents, Rosita and Howell Donaldson Jr., face civil contempt charges because of their refusal to answer prosecutors’ questions about their son, the Times reported.

What You Need To Know About Jordan Peele

What You Need To Know About Jordan Peele

NFL reportedly has plan to protect Tom Brady's jersey

The NFL doesn’t want any thievery going on after the Super Bowl like last year’s theft. The jersey of New England quarterback Tom Brady was stolen after the Patriots’ comeback victory. When it was eventually found, it was discovered that the thief had stolen from the Denver Broncos when they won Super Bowl 50. Now, the NFL reportedly has a plan in place to protect all game-worn memorabilia.

>> Read more trending news/

There will be “federal agencies, multiple state agencies and private security plus surveillance everywhere,” according to TMZ Sports

They’re making Brady’s jersey sound like the Holy Grail of sports memorabilia and it could very well become that should the Patriots win yet another Super Bowl, giving Bill Belichick and Brady their sixth ring together.

When Brady’s jersey was stolen last year it was reportedly tracked down by a fan and not the FBI. It was tracked down to Mexico and was stolen by a man named Martin Mauricio Ortega, who has now been banned from all NFL games, according to TMZ Sports. When the FBI did catch up with Ortega, they also found a Brady-worn jersey from Super Bowl XLIX, when the Patriots beat the Seahawks.

A sixth Super Bowl win for the Patriots would tie them with the Pittsburgh Steelers for most all-time by a team, and it would give Brady the record for most Super Bowl victories. He is tied with former Cowboys and 49ers linebacker Charles Haley.

Inspiration for 'Rosie the Riveter,' Naomi Parker Fraley, dies

The woman who many believe empowered housewives to leave their kitchens and enter the workplace left empty when men went to fight in World War II has died.

Naomi Parker Fraley was discovered in 2015 to have been the inspiration for the “Rosie the Riveter” poster tha decades earlier had become the symbol in which women realized “We Can Do It.”

>> Read more trending news 

Fraley was a factory worker at Alameda Naval Station when a photographer asked to take her photo. With her hair in a bandana, just like the poster, Fraley is believed to be the starting point for the artist’s representation of women taking over what had been a men’s world, CNN reported.

Fraley was only 20 years old and was working with her 18-year-old sister at the time of the war, KATU reported.

She realized it was her photo that helped started the movement during a convention of women WWII factory workers. Her photo was labeled as the poster’s inspiration. Originally the photo was identified as that of Geraldine Hoff Doyle, but years of research confirmed in 2015 it was Fraley in the photo instead, CNN reported.

The man who made the identification, Dr. James Kimble, said of Fraley, “She didn't’ think she did anything special. A lot of women did what she did. She just wanted her picture corrected,” CNN reported.

Fraley died in Longview, Washington, Saturday, the BBC reported. She was 96.

Police plan to ramp up security at Jackson Browne concert in Florida after threat

There will be increased security during singer-songwriter Jackson Browne’s concert Tuesday evening at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts after a threat was made at a northwest Indiana church known for its progressive stands on racial and social justice issues, the Orlando Police Department said.

>> Read more trending news

Police said banners with racist and anti-gay messages were discovered Sunday attached to a fence outside the Unitarian Universalist Church in West Lafayette, Indiana, which is about 70 miles northwest of Indianapolis.

The banners were discovered the morning after the church hosted a “Resistance Fair,” which included left-leaning groups that oppose President Donald Trump's agenda.

One banner included a slur against gays and lesbians; the second had slurs against racial minorities, gays and lesbians.

The second one also referenced Browne, while the other included the date Jan. 23 and the message "die Orlando just like Los (sic) Vegas,” referencing Browne’s appearance in Orlando.

The other wording appears to refer to the sniper who opened fire in October from a high-rise hotel in Las Vegas, killing 58 people and injuring more than 800 others.

West Lafayette police said they are investigating the incident and have notified the FBI.

Orlando police officials said they are in communication with police in Indiana.

“The safety and security of our guests, colleagues and artists is our highest priority,” Lorri Shaban, spokeswoman for the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, said in an emailed statement. “We were made aware of the situation Sunday night and have been working closely with law enforcement to ensure a safe, secure environment for the concert.”

Those who purchased tickets for the concert but don't feel safe may call the venue's box office for a refund, Shaban said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Clotilda: Last-known slave ship uncovered after East Coast ‘Bomb Cyclone’

Years of research and a particularly strong winter storm has led a reporter in Alabama to what is likely the remains of the last ship to carry slave cargo from Africa to the United States.

Writer Ben Raines of al.com reported Tuesday that what is left of the slave ship Clotilda, “lies partially buried in mud alongside an island in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, a few miles north of the city of Mobile. The hull is tipped to the port side, which appears almost completely buried in mud. The entire length of the starboard side, however, is almost fully exposed.”

The ship’s remains were discovered by Raines when the “Bomb Cyclone” winter system hit the eastern half of the country earlier this month. A confluence of strong systems created the storm that caused the tide in Mobile Bay to be especially low, Raines pointed out. The lower than normal tide better exposed what was left of the ship.

In the story, Raines says he documented the wreck with historical documents and photos – the remains rest in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, accessible only by boat – and took his findings to a team of archaeologists from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, Fla.

>> Read more trending news

The archaeologists agreed that Raines had probably found what was left of the Clotilda.

In the summer of 1860, the Clotilda brought 110 men, women and children from Africa to Alabama in violation of U.S. laws that banned international slave trade. The ship’s trans-Atlantic journey was the last recorded trip bringing human cargo from an African nation to the United States.

The expedition was financed by Timothy Meaher, a wealthy Mobile businessman who made a bet that he could sneak slaves into the country past forts on either side of the entrance to Mobile Bay, “under the officers’ noses.” 

Meaher was able to hire a ship and captain to bring the slaves to Mobile, but fearing that he would be caught and punished for the stunt, Meaher arranged for the ship to be burned after he had the slaves unloaded.

Those 110 slaves who were brought over on the Clotilda were freed five years later at the end of the Civil War. They asked Meaher to pay for their return to Africa. He refused, and the group went on to petition the U.S. government for the money. When the government refused, the group took up residence near Mobile, creating the community of Africatown.

The town, according to historian Sylvianne Diouf in her book “Dreams of Africa in Alabama,” was run under traditional African law and used African farming and education methods. The last survivor of the Clotilda trip, Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis , died in 1935, though descendants of the slaves brought over on the ship still live in the area.

The story of the Clotilda was recently resurrected in an episode of the PBS series “Finding Your Roots,” hosted by historian Henry Gates. In a December episode, Roots front man and drummer Questlove – whose given name is Ahmir Thompson – finds out that his great, great, great grandfather, Charles Lewis, was one of the slaves brought to America on the Clotilda’s trip.

Gates tells Questlove that Meaher chose the more than 100 slaves from a group of 4,000 to be brought to Alabama. Lewis was one of those chosen.

"Think about the odds, man," Gates said.

Click here to read Raines’ full story on finding the Clotilda. 

 

Hawaii governor couldn't correct missile alert sooner because he forgot Twitter password 

Forgetting a password to a social media account can be embarrassing, and that memory lapse caused some anxious moments in Hawaii when a missile alert was sent by mistake.

>> Read more trending news

When the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency sent the incorrect alert on Jan. 13, panic gripped the state. It took Hawaii Gov. David Ige 17 minutes to take to Twitter to reassure the public that the alert was a false alarm.

The reason, he admitted Monday, is that Ige forgot his Twitter password, The Washington Post reported.

“I have to confess that I don’t know my Twitter account log-ons and the passwords, so certainly that’s one of the changes that I’ve made,” Ige said after he gave his State of the State address, the Post reported.

The missile alert was sent at 8:07 a.m., and Ige was informed by the state’s adjutant general that it was false two minutes after it was sent, the Post reported. Ige posted to Twitter at 8:24, tweeting, “There is NO missile threat.”

The governor posted to his Facebook account 23 minutes after the alert was sent. Ige did not say if he had forgotten his Facebook login credentials, the Post reported.

“I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team both in Hawaii Emergency Management as well as others,” Ige told reporters Monday. “The focus really was on trying to get as many people informed about the fact that it was a false alert.”

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >