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At Glastonbury, Depp asks about assassinating the president

Johnny Depp has asked a crowd at the Glastonbury Festival when was the last time an actor assassinated a president. The remarks came during a segment Thursday in which Depp was speaking about President Donald Trump.

He asked the question at the annual festival that celebrates the performing arts.

The 54-year-old "Pirates of the Caribbean" star followed by saying that he is not an actor, but someone who lies for a living.

However, he said, it's "been a while, and maybe it's time."

Actor John Wilkes Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln in 1865.

Depp was at the festival to introduce a screening of his 2004 film "The Libertine."

He played Trump last year in a Fun or Die video parody of the businessman's 1987 book "The Art of the Deal."

‘Cake Boss’ star Buddy Valastro's mother dies from ALS complications

The mother of “Cake Boss” star Buddy Valastro has died after a yearslong battle with Lou Gehrig's disease, which is also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. She was 69 years old. 

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Valestro’s representative confirmed the news in a statement to People.

“Mary took a turn yesterday, and Buddy rushed back to New Jersey last night to be by her side. She passed early this morning, June 22nd, surrounded by all of her children. Mary’s condition had been steadily worsening these past months, so it was not sudden but still extremely heartbreaking for the family. After eight years of fighting her battle with ALS, the family is relieved she is no longer suffering. Buddy and his sisters are absolutely crushed right now.”

Valastro also shared his grief with fans in a post on Instagram.

“It’s with an extremely heavy heart that I must share the news of my mother’s passing,” he wrote alongside the photo of his mother. “She left for heaven this morning, surrounded by the family. This is a difficult time for all of us and I do ask for your patience and respect while we let this sink in. Her battle with ALS has ended, she is no longer suffering and I hope she’s dancing to ‘I Will Survive’ with my dad right now.”

After her diagnosis, the Carlo’s Bakery owner started the Mama Mary Foundation to raise funds and awareness for ALS.

Carrie Underwood Is Getting a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Carrie Underwood's trailblazing decade-plus career has landed her in Hollywood.

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‘Baby Driver’ cast talks heart-pounding, toe-tapping summer action flick

Actor Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm and Jamie Foxx star in the summer’s most anticipated action movie, and it’s equal parts heart-pounding thrills and toe-tapping musical.

Car crashes, romance and a musical backdrop make “Baby Driver” a genre-bending adrenaline kick from writer/director Edgar Wright.

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“We had a very good blueprint to work with from Edgar,” Jon Hamm told Hot Topics digital producer Jessica Sooknanan. “Not only his script and his shot-list essentially. He had the whole movie story boarded out.”

The film stars Ansel Elgort, who plays a skilled getaway driver in Atlanta serving kingpin Kevin Spacey and cronies Hamm and Jamie Foxx.

Wright wrote nearly every scene to the beat of a killer song.

“Everything really, even to the syncopation of what he hears when we do ADR, he really wanted it to bound the right way. It was magical in that way,” said Foxx.

It turns out, shooting guns on-beat is harder than it looks.

“It was really hard,” said Eiza Gonzales, who plays Hamm’s love interest, Darling. “When Jamie shot, then I knew someone else was going to shoot and then I was there, but you had to have the beat.”

>> Related: Ron Howard tapped to direct Han Solo stand-alone film

You’re not going to want to blink in the caffeinated heist thriller, or you might miss a musical cameo.

“There’s a brief appearance by Big Boi and Killer Mike, Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sky Ferrerira, Paul Williams, Jon Spencer. To be honest, I would have done even more,” Wright said.

“Baby Driver” opens in the U.S. on June 28.

Bernie Mac, Snoop Dogg to get Hollywood Walk of Fame stars

Snoop Dogg, Shonda Rhimes, "Weird Al" Yankovic and late entertainers Bernie Mac and Steve Irwin will be receiving stars on Hollywood's Walk of Fame next year.

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce revealed the 2018 honorees Thursday.

Other recipients include Lin-Manuel Miranda, Taraji P. Henson, RuPaul, Simon Cowell, Jennifer Lawrence, Zoe Saldana and Lynda Carter.

Jack Black, Anthony Anderson, Carrie Underwood and Mary J. Blige are also part of the Walk of Fame's class of 2018.

So are business magnate Richard Branson and Steve Jones, the former The Sex Pistols member turned radio host.

Anyone can nominate a celebrity for Walk of Fame star consideration.

Selections are made by a Chamber of Commerce committee.

Walk of Fame honorees or their sponsoring studios must pay $40,000 for each star granted.

Spokesman: Cosby plans tour to educate youth on misbehavior

Bill Cosby will organize a series of town hall meetings to help educate young people about problems their misbehavior could create and other issues, a spokesman for Cosby said.

Cosby is eager to get back to work following a deadlocked jury and mistrial in his sexual assault case, spokesman Andrew Wyatt told Birmingham, Alabama, TV station WBRC on Wednesday.

"We'll talk to young people. Because this is bigger than Bill Cosby. You know, this, this issue can affect any young person, especially young athletes of today," Wyatt said. "And they need to know what they're facing when they're hanging out and partying, when they're doing certain things they shouldn't be doing.

"And it also affects married men," Wyatt said, without elaborating.

"Is it kind of a, 'Do as I say, not as I do' situation?" the newscaster asked, but it was unclear if Wyatt heard and responded to the question.

Prosecutors have said Cosby will be retried on sexual assault charges stemming from former Temple University worker Andrea Constand's allegations that Cosby drugged and molested her in 2004. Cosby contends the encounter was consensual.

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, an anti-sexual violence organization known as RAINN, responded to Cosby's announced plans.

"It would be more useful if Mr. Cosby would spend time talking with people about how not to commit sexual assault in the first place," RAINN spokeswoman Jodi Omear said in a statement.

In a statement Thursday to The Associated Press, Wyatt expanded on his remarks.

He said that many civic organizations and churches have called asking that Cosby speak to young men and women about the judicial system and how it can be used for "personal agenda and political ambitions."

"They feel that the young men and women need to be aware that Mr. Cosby was given a deal to never be criminally charged" in the Andrea Constand case, he said.

A town hall will be held in Birmingham in July, Wyatt said. He didn't identify the date or location or any other cities that will be visited.

Also taking part in the TV interview was Wyatt associate Ebonee Benson, who had read comments from Cosby's wife, Camille, slamming prosecutors after the trial's end last weekend in Norristown, Pennsylvania.

"Laws are changing," Benson said on Thursday. "The statute of limitations for victims of sexual assault are being extended. So this is why people need to be educated on a brush against the shoulder, you know anything at this point can be considered sexual assault. And it's ... a good thing to be educated about the law."

Lecturing isn't new for Cosby. In recent years, the comedian and actor became known for scolding fellow African-Americans for poor grammar, sloppy dress and not valuing education, critiques that drew fire from some as elitist.

It also led indirectly to the reopening of the examination of his past.

In 2014, black standup comedian Hannibal Buress slammed Cosby on stage, calling him a self-righteous scold and adding, "You rape women, Bill Cosby."

Video of Buress' remarks was widely viewed online, and a number of women came forward to share similar stories alleging sexual abuse by Cosby. Prosecutors ultimately reopened Constand's case.

During the trial, Constand testified that Cosby drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. Cosby did not testify during the trial, but has said his contact with the former director of women's basketball operations at his alma mater, Temple University, was consensual.

A juror in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial said Thursday that some jurors were concerned that prosecutors waited 10 years to charge him, expressing suspicion that politics had played a role in the case.

The juror told The Associated Press that the panel was almost evenly split in its deliberations, with a similar number of jurors wanting to convict the 79-year-old entertainer as acquit him.

The AP does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

George Orwell's son says his father's '1984' was 'prescient'

The audience at the opening night on Broadway of a new stage adaptation of George Orwell's dystopian fantasy "1984" will include a special guest — the author's son.

Richard Blair, whose father finished the book in 1949 when he was a young boy, was in New York on Thursday to cheer on the cast amid a huge jump in interest of his father's nightmarish vison of the future.

"His novel '1984' was his take on what could possibly happen — not necessarily will happen — but, as it turned out, it was really quite prescient," said Blair. "Crickey, it's still fresh today as it was then."

The novel tells the story of a man who works at the Ministry of Truth falsifying war news and promoting adoration of the mythical leader Big Brother. The play version stars Olivia Wilde, Tom Sturridge and Reed Birney.

Orwell's portrait of a government that manufactures its own facts, demands total obedience and demonizes foreign enemies has enjoyed renewed attention of late, along with other dystopian tales, like Hulu's version of "The Handmaid's Tale."

One edition of "1984" saw sales jump by 10,000 percent since January, when Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway defended incorrect claims as "alternative facts." It instantly drew comparisons to Orwell's terms "doublethink" and "newspeak" and to the type of government manipulation the author wrote about nearly 70 years ago.

His son said his father's lesson is timeless: "Man has been doing this to himself now since he came out of the trees," said Blair, a retired engineer. "Man is always trying to put one over on his fellow man and get the upper hand."

Orwell, the pen name for Eric Arthur Blair, seemed to predict the government's mass surveillance programs and data mining in the age of Facebook and WikiLeaks. But his son has seen his father's profile jump every few years, surviving the end of the Cold War and thriving under the Trump administration.

"As the decades have gone by, world events tend to collide with '1984' and suddenly everyone wakes up and says, 'Oh my goodness. This is a bit Orwellian, isn't it?' And a lot of them rush and start buying '1984' and realizing that fiction is imitating life or life is imitating fiction," said Blair.

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Online: http://www.RevisedTruth.com

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Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Judges: 'Making a Murderer' confession improperly obtained

The confession of a Wisconsin inmate featured in the Netflix series "Making a Murderer" was improperly obtained and he should be retried or released from prison, a three-judge federal appeals panel ruled Thursday.

Brendan Dassey was sentenced to life in prison in 2007 in photographer Teresa Halbach's death on Halloween two years earlier. Dassey told detectives he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill Halbach in the Avery family's Manitowoc County salvage yard. Avery was sentenced to life in a separate trial.

A federal magistrate judge ruled in August that investigators coerced Dassey, who was 16 years old at the time and suffered from cognitive problems, into confessing and overturned his conviction. The state Justice Department appealed the ruling to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a move that kept Dassey, now 27, behind bars pending the outcome.

A three-judge panel from the Chicago-based 7th Circuit upheld the magistrate's decision to overturn his conviction. Wisconsin can appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, ask for a review by the full 7th Circuit or retry Dassey within 90 days.

Johnny Koremenos, a spokesman for Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, said the office expects to seek review by the full 7th Circuit or the U.S. Supreme Court, and hopes "that today's erroneous decision will be reversed."

"We continue to send our condolences to the Halbach family as they have to suffer through another attempt by Mr. Dassey to re-litigate his guilty verdict and sentence," Koremenos said.

Dassey's lawyers from the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth at Northwestern University said they're elated and will take immediate steps to secure his release.

Attorney Laura Nirider said they want to send Dassey home to his mother as soon as possible. She said they did the math and determined that he had been in prison for 4,132 days as of Thursday.

The center's director, Steven Drizin, said the ruling provides a model for the kind of thorough analysis that courts should always undertake in assessing whether a confession was voluntary, and highlights the importance for teenagers to have parents or trusted adults in the interrogation room.

"While these tactics might not have overwhelmed a seasoned criminal or a 30-year-old with a law degree, they clearly overwhelmed a 16-year-old, socially avoidant, intellectually limited (youth) who had never been interrogated by the police before," he said.

The appellate panel split, with Judges Ilana Rovner and Ann Williams affirming and David Hamilton in dissent. The majority opinion by Rovner said "no reasonable court" could have any confidence that Dassey's confession was voluntary. It cited "the leading, the fact-feeding, the false promises, the manipulation of Dassey's desire to please" as among many factors that cast it in doubt.

Hamilton, in dissent, wrote: "The majority's decision breaks new ground and poses troubling questions for police and prosecutors. It calls into question standard interrogation techniques that courts have routinely found permissible, even in cases involving juveniles."

Avery and Dassey contend they were framed by police angry with Avery for suing Manitowoc County over his wrongful conviction for sexual assault. Avery spent 18 years in prison in that case before DNA tests showed he didn't commit the crime. He's pursuing his own appeal in state court.

Their cases gained national attention in 2015 after Netflix aired "Making a Murderer," a multi-part documentary looking at Halbach's death, the ensuing investigation and trials. The series sparked widespread conjecture about the pair's innocence and has garnered them a massive following on social media pushing for their release.

Authorities who worked on the cases insisted the documentary is biased. Ken Kratz, the prosecutor, wrote in his book "Avery" that Dassey was "a shuffling, mumbling young man with bad skin and broken-bowl haircut" who could have saved Halbach's life but instead involved himself in her rape and murder and Avery is "by any measure of the evidence, stone guilty."

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Karnowski reported from Minneapolis. Associated Press writer Gretchen Ehlke contributed from Milwaukee.

Colbert goes to Russia, vows to search for Comey 'tapes'

Stephen Colbert is on a mission to Russia.

The host of CBS' "The Late Show" is on assignment there for a future broadcast, the network said Thursday.

Colbert, whose steady political wisecracks have been accompanied by a rise in his ratings, wasted no time in taking a dig at President Donald Trump over the possibility of tapes involving fired FBI Director James Comey.

"Don't worry, Mr. President. I'm in Russia. If the "tapes" exist, I'll bring you back a copy!" Colbert tweeted.

His message came after Trump said on Twitter that he has no recordings of his private conversations with Comey, despite an earlier suggestion that they might exist.

Colbert also posted a photo of himself wearing a trench coat and in front of a grand building that appeared to be the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg.

A CBS spokeswoman said she had no information on where Colbert was visiting or how the material he was gathering in Russia would be used.

Kellie Pickler Sings Beautiful Ballad About the Grandmother Who Raised Her

Kellie Pickler treated fans at CMA Fest 2017 to a brand new song in June while performing at Nashville's Ascend Amphitheater.

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