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8 Unforgettable Johnny Cash Moments

Johnny Cash is an icon. The late country legend was a trailblazer for country music and one of the most influential musicians of all time in any genre. He left behind a catalog of highs, a few lows and some simply unforgettable moments on film and television.

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Swedes puzzle over Fox News' Swedish 'security advisor'

A trans-Atlantic wave of puzzlement is rippling across Sweden for the second time in a week, after a prominent Fox News program featured a "Swedish defense and national security advisor" who's unknown to the country's military and foreign-affairs officials.

Swedes, and some Americans, have been wondering about representations of the Nordic nation in the U.S. since President Donald Trump invoked "what's happening last night in Sweden" while alluding to past terror attacks in Europe during a rally Feb. 18. There hadn't been any major incident in Sweden the previous night.

Then, Fox News commentator Bill O'Reilly convened an on-air faceoff Thursday over Swedish immigration and crime between a Swedish newspaper reporter and a man identified on screen and verbally as a "Swedish defense and national security advisor," Nils Bildt.

Bildt linked immigration to social problems in Sweden, lamented what he described as Swedish liberal close-mindedness about the downsides of welcoming newcomers and said: "We are unable in Sweden to socially integrate these people," arguing that politicians lacked a systematic plan to do so.

But if viewers might have taken the "advisor" for a government insider, the Swedish Defense Ministry and Foreign Office told the newspaper Dagens Nyheter they knew nothing of him. Calls to Swedish officials Saturday weren't immediately returned.

Bildt is a founding member of a corporate geopolitical strategy and security consulting business with offices in Washington, Brussels and Tokyo, according its website. His bio speaks to expertise on defense and national security issues, saying his experience includes serving as a naval officer, working for a Japanese official and writing books on issues ranging from investment and political climates to security issues in working in hostile environments.

But security experts in Sweden said he wasn't a familiar figure in their ranks in that country.

"He is in not in any way a known quantity in Sweden and has never been part of the Swedish debate," Swedish Defence University leadership professor Robert Egnell said by email to The Associated Press on Saturday. He and Bildt — also known then as Nils Tolling — were in a master's degree program in war studies together at King's College London in 2002-2003, and Bildt moved to Japan soon after, he said.

The executive producer of "The O'Reilly Factor" said Bildt was recommended by people the show's booker consulted while making numerous inquiries about potential guests.

"After pre-interviewing him and reviewing his bio, we agreed that he would make a good guest for the topic that evening," executive producer David Tabacoff said in a statement.

The network said O'Reilly was expected to address the subject further on Monday's show.

Bildt didn't respond Saturday to email inquiries; a person who answered the phone at his company agreed to relay one. He told Dagens Nyheter on Friday that he was a U.S.-based independent analyst, and Fox News had chosen its description of him.

"Sorry for any confusion caused, but needless to say I think that is not really the issue. The issue is Swedish refusal to discuss their social problems and issues," he added in a statement to the news website Mediaite, explaining his profession as being an independent political adviser.

Trump's initial remark about "last night in Sweden" stirred a burst of social media mockery, while Trump explained on Twitter that he was referring to a Fox News piece on immigration and Sweden that he'd seen the night before.

Trump and his supporters, though, saw vindication when a riot broke out Monday after police arrested a drug suspect in a predominantly immigrant suburb of Stockholm. Cars were set on fire and shops looted, and one policeman was slightly injured.

Trump took to Twitter again Monday to declare that large-scale immigration in Sweden was "NOT!" working out well, upsetting many Swedes.

___

Associated Press writers Jan Olsen in Copenhagen and Mesfin Fedaku in New York contributed to this report.

Swedes puzzle over Fox News' Swedish 'security advisor'

A trans-Atlantic wave of puzzlement is rippling across Sweden for the second time in a week, after a prominent Fox News program featured a "Swedish defense and national security advisor" who's unknown to the country's military and foreign-affairs officials.

Swedes, and some Americans, have been wondering about representations of the Nordic nation in the U.S. since President Donald Trump invoked "what's happening last night in Sweden" while alluding to past terror attacks in Europe during a rally Feb. 18. There hadn't been any major incident in Sweden the previous night.

Then, Fox News commentator Bill O'Reilly convened an on-air faceoff Thursday over Swedish immigration and crime between a Swedish newspaper reporter and a man identified on screen and verbally as a "Swedish defense and national security advisor," Nils Bildt.

Bildt linked immigration to social problems in Sweden, lamented what he described as Swedish liberal close-mindedness about the downsides of welcoming newcomers and said: "We are unable in Sweden to socially integrate these people," arguing that politicians lacked a systematic plan to do so.

But if viewers might have taken the "advisor" for a government insider, the Swedish Defense Ministry and Foreign Office told the newspaper Dagens Nyheter they knew nothing of him. Calls to Swedish officials Saturday weren't immediately returned.

Bildt is a founding member of a corporate geopolitical strategy and security consulting business with offices in Washington, Brussels and Tokyo, according its website. His bio speaks to expertise on defense and national security issues, saying his experience includes serving as a naval officer, working for a Japanese official and writing books on issues ranging from investment and political climates to security issues in working in hostile environments.

But security experts in Sweden said he wasn't a familiar figure in their ranks in that country.

"He is in not in any way a known quantity in Sweden and has never been part of the Swedish debate," Swedish Defence University leadership professor Robert Egnell said by email to The Associated Press on Saturday. He and Bildt — also known then as Nils Tolling — were in a master's degree program in war studies together at King's College London in 2002-2003, and Bildt moved to Japan soon after, he said.

The executive producer of "The O'Reilly Factor" said Bildt was recommended by people the show's booker consulted while making numerous inquiries about potential guests.

"After pre-interviewing him and reviewing his bio, we agreed that he would make a good guest for the topic that evening," executive producer David Tabacoff said in a statement.

The network said O'Reilly was expected to address the subject further on Monday's show.

Bildt didn't respond Saturday to email inquiries; a person who answered the phone at his company agreed to relay one. He told Dagens Nyheter on Friday that he was a U.S.-based independent analyst, and Fox News had chosen its description of him.

"Sorry for any confusion caused, but needless to say I think that is not really the issue. The issue is Swedish refusal to discuss their social problems and issues," he added in a statement to the news website Mediaite, explaining his profession as being an independent political adviser.

Trump's initial remark about "last night in Sweden" stirred a burst of social media mockery, while Trump explained on Twitter that he was referring to a Fox News piece on immigration and Sweden that he'd seen the night before.

Trump and his supporters, though, saw vindication when a riot broke out Monday after police arrested a drug suspect in a predominantly immigrant suburb of Stockholm. Cars were set on fire and shops looted, and one policeman was slightly injured.

Trump took to Twitter again Monday to declare that large-scale immigration in Sweden was "NOT!" working out well, upsetting many Swedes.

___

Associated Press writers Jan Olsen in Copenhagen and Mesfin Fedaku in New York contributed to this report.

Trump slams New York Times ad set to air during Academy Awards

A New York Times ad scheduled to run during the Academy Awards on Sunday night already has at least one critic – President Donald Trump.

>> Trump tweets he won't attend White House correspondents' dinner

"For the first time the failing @nytimes will take an ad (a bad one) to help save its failing reputation. Try reporting accurately & fairly!" Trump tweeted early Sunday about the commercial, the newspaper's first TV spot in seven years. 

>> See the tweet here

For first time the failing @nytimes will take an ad (a bad one) to help save its failing reputation. Try reporting accurately & fairly!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 26, 2017 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Trump's comment comes days after the Times, CNN and other news organizations said they were denied entry to an off-camera White House "gaggle" with Press Secretary Sean Spicer and one day after Trump announced he won't be attending the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner.

>> CNN, New York Times barred from White House press briefing

The 30-second commercial, called "The Truth Is Hard," was posted Thursday on YouTube and has been viewed more than 2.6 million times.

>> Watch the ad here

<iframe width="390" height="219" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gY0Fdz350GE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

>> Read more trending news

The Oscars broadcast begins at 8:30 p.m. ET Sunday on ABC.

Zach Braff, 'SNL' fans say Alec Baldwin should play Trump at White House Correspondents' Dinner

If you can't get the real president to attend your event, why not get the fake one?

>> Trump tweets he won't attend White House correspondents' dinner

That's what actor Zach Braff and "Saturday Night Live" fans are saying on Twitter after President Donald Trump announced Saturday that he won't be going to the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner on April 29.

"I will not be attending the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner this year," Trump tweeted Saturday afternoon. "Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!"

>> See the tweet here

I will not be attending the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner this year. Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 25, 2017

Minutes later, Braff called for actor Alec Baldwin, who plays Trump on "SNL," to stand in for the president.

".@AlecBaldwin time to suit up," he tweeted.

>> See the tweet here

.@AlecBaldwin time to suit up. https://t.co/DfVnzAYxSG— Zach Braff (@zachbraff) February 25, 2017

Braff was not alone.

Email from a viewer: "PLEASE, please, have Alec Baldwin invited to the White House Correspondents dinner since Trump is not going..."— Brian Stelter (@brianstelter) February 25, 2017

Yuge opening for Alec Baldwin to get some extra work that evening... https://t.co/cQoERmmLf6— Brian Klaas (@brianklaas) February 25, 2017

Oh pleeeeeez Alec Baldwin go as trump at Correspondents Dinner!!!!— Diane Warren (@Diane_Warren) February 25, 2017

Hey @whca, since @realDonaldTrump has announced that he' not attending, it only makes sense that @AlecBaldwin deliver the keynote. #WHCA— April (@ReignOfApril) February 25, 2017

.@realDonaldTrump I hope they replace you with Alec Baldwin.— Dan Wilbur (@DanWilbur) February 25, 2017

No word yet on whether Baldwin is interested in attending the event, which raises money for college scholarships and usually involves roasts of both the current president and the media.

>> Read more trending news

According to Poynter, the last time a president missed the dinner was 1981, when then-President Ronald Reagan was recovering from a gunshot wound. But Reagan still called in to the event, addressing guests by phone.

Bill Maher sounds off on media in first show since Milo Yiannopoulos interview

Hours after several media publications were barred from an informal briefing with White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, comedian Bill Maher discussed the state of the press on his HBO program.

>> Bill Maher takes credit for Milo Yiannopoulos' downfall

Maher has had his own contentious relationship with the media and was criticized by many outlets for giving a platform to former Breitbart News senior editor Milo Yiannopoulos. On Friday’s edition of “Real Time with Bill Maher,” Maher pulled out a recent Fox News survey that showed that more people trusted President Donald Trump, who regularly rails against the media for printing negative stories about him, than the media itself.

>> Leslie Jones on Milo Yiannopoulos: 'I was done the day I blocked him'

“Can you imagine how this must make a reporter feel? To be losing a truthfulness contest to Donald Trump?” Maher joked. “It’s like losing a rap battle to Mitt Romney.”

Maher implored the press to go hard against Trump and to lose some of the lighter stories that receive coverage.

>> Milo Yiannopoulos resigns from Breitbart amid controversy over pedophilia comments

“You have to win your respect back so Trump can’t say, ‘The people don’t believe you; you’re a joke,’” Maher said.

Maher also criticized members of the press for giving Trump such a platform during the 2016 presidential election.

>> Milo Yiannopoulos book deal canceled following remarks on pedophilia 

“You can be mad at me for 'giving a platform' to Milo, but Donald Trump is the apotheosis of the alt-right, and the media gave him the biggest platform ever,” Maher said. “They covered every rally like we put a game show on the moon. They made him look like he was president before he was.”

>> Read more trending news

Though he was critical of some coverage, Maher took time to praise several journalists, including Scott Pelley, Chuck Todd and George Stephanopoulos.

Jamie Lynn Spears shares happy update about daughter Maddie's recovery

Good news for the Spears family: Maddie has made a full recovery.

>> Jamie Lynn Spears' daughter leaves hospital after ATV accident

Earlier this month, the 8-year-old daughter of Jamie Lynn Spears was injured in an ATV accident that left her in critical condition for days. But she was eventually released from the hospital and has even returned to school.

Spears, the sister of pop star Britney Spears, took to Twitter on Saturday to share the update, saying, “Blessed to say my daughter has fully recovered & returned to her normal activities. It’s my first day back to work. Love y’all.”

>> See the tweet here

Blessed to say my daughter has fully recovered & returned to her normal activities It's my first day back to work love y'all#Godisgood pic.twitter.com/FGprExJKnl— Jamie Lynn Spears (@jamielynnspears) February 25, 2017

>> Read more trending news

After the accident, Maddie was airlifted to the hospital, where she remained unconscious for two days. Not only did she return to school to pass out valentines to her class, but she has also attended her first basketball practice since the incident. Jamie Lynn, husband Jamie Watson and Britney Spears asked fans for their prayers during the difficult time.

Muhammad Ali's son asked, 'Are you Muslim?' by border agents

Ali Jr., 44, who confirmed his Muslim faith, was detained about two hours, despite telling officials that he's Ali's son and a native-born U.S. citizen, said Chris Mancini, a family friend and attorney.

Returning from a Black History Month event in Jamaica, Muhammad Ali Jr. and his mother, Khalilah Camacho Ali, were pulled aside and separated from each other on Feb. 7 at the immigration checkpoint at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, said Mancini.

Camacho Ali was released a short time later after showing a photo of herself with her ex-husband, the former heavyweight boxing champion, Mancini said. But Ali Jr. was not carrying a photo of his world-famous father — a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

It was the first time Ali Jr. and his mother have ever been asked if they're Muslim when re-entering the United States, Mancini said.

"From the way they were treated, from what was said to them, they can come up with no other rational explanation except they fell into a profiling program run by customs, which is designed to obtain information from anyone who says they're a Muslim," Mancini said in a phone interview. "It's quite clear that what triggered his detention was his Arabic name and his religion."

U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Daniel Hetlage confirmed Saturday evening that Ali Jr. was held for questioning by customs officers, but said "it wasn't because he's a Muslim and it wasn't because of his Arabic-sounding name."

The agency said in a statement that its officers process more than 1.2 million international travelers daily with "vigilance and in accordance with the law." It said it does not discriminate based on religion, race, ethnicity or sexual orientation.

"We treat all travelers with respect and sensitivity," the agency said. "Integrity is our cornerstone. We are guided by the highest ethical and moral principles."

During his detention, Ali Jr. was asked repeatedly about his lineage and his name, "as if that was a pre-programmed question that was part of a profile," Mancini said.

Ali Jr. and his mother have been frequent global travelers. The family connects their treatment to President Donald Trump's efforts to restrict immigration after calling during his campaign for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

"This has never happened to them before," Mancini said. "They're asked specifically about their Arabic names. Where they got their names from and whether they're Muslims. It doesn't take much to connect those dots to what Trump is doing."

Camacho Ali and Ali Jr. live in Florida. They have not traveled abroad since, and are considering filing a federal lawsuit, he said.

Asked why the matter was just now coming to light, Mancini said: "Khalilah had prior commitments as did I and when she finally got in to see me for a legal opinion of what they did, I brought it to the media immediately."

Ali, the three-time heavyweight champion and humanitarian, died last June at age 74 after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. People lined the streets of Louisville, Kentucky, to say goodbye to the city's most celebrated son before a star-studded memorial service watched worldwide.

Photos: 2017 Spirit Awards show

Photos: 2017 Spirit Awards red carpet

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